beer, History

Alaska : North to the Future

From Alaska, we were able to get our hands on 3 different brews, all from Anchorage Brewing Company, and each of these brews were unique in their own way.

Alaska Craft Beer

Bitter Monk, Belgian Style IPA from Anchorage Brewing Company

The first beer we had from Alaska was called a Belgian IPA called Bitter Monk. This was the first IPA we had that was brewed with Brettanomyces, and it was amazing. This beer started with a huge citrus smell, like a glass of grapefruit juice, and it tasted amazing. At first I was worried. Between the Brettanomyces, the Belgian-style IPA and its aging in Chardonnay barrels, there were many places for this beer to go wrong, but it never did. Instead, it was an incredibly unique beer that I will not forget anytime soon.

Moving on from the Bitter Monk, we opened another bomber from Anchorage Brewing. This one an Imperial Stout called Darkest Hour. This is another beer that appears to have had the kitchen sink thrown at it.

Alaska Craft Beer

Darkest Hour Imperial Stout from Anchorage Brewing

Triple fermented, aged in two different barrels, first a Pinot Noir barrel, then a Rye whiskey barrel, and finally bottle conditioned with a wine yeast. Again, like the Bitter Monk, this beer had plenty of opportunities to go wrong, and just like the Bitter Monk it never did.

From the bottle to the glass, this beer poured like syrup. It was dark in color and smelled of chocolate and coffee, with hints of rye and pinot noir from the barrels. With its strong chocolate and coffee flavors, this beer is clearly a coffee beer. It was very sweet tasting, with a slight grainy mouthfeel reminiscent of Mexican chocolate. The character of this beer was amazing, and the flavors were complex. The only issue we kept coming back to was the smell. There was something strange with the mixture of all that was going on that interfered with everything else, keeping us from truly loving this brew. Still, it was one of the best beers of the year.

Alaska Craft Beer

Anadromous Black Sour Ale from Anchorage Brewing

The final beer from Anchorage brewing was a Black Sour Ale called Anadromous. Wow, this was yet another amazing beer from Anchorage. I loved the sour taste, and the complex fruit flavors.

This week, we got our hands on three different brews from Anchorage, and they were all special. There is clearly something amazing going on up in Alaska.

One more post, and 50 states have been covered. Next up Hawaii.

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New Mexico : Red or Green

This is the second week in a row that we only had one beer to represent the state. But one is better than none! We are now 47 weeks into the project, and we are drinking beer from the 47th state of the union, New Mexico.

New Mexico Craft Beer

IPA from Marble Brewery

Our beer from New Mexico was an IPA from Marble Brewery. Marble is located in Albuquerque, the largest city in the state of New Mexico. Opened in 2008, Marble provided Albuquerque with a beer garden and on-site tasting room just blocks from the historic Southwestern Brewery. Now defunct, the Southwestern Brewery was once the one of the largest employers of the Albuquerque, and a provider of beer through out the soiuthwest. Southwestern suffered the fate of many other early brewers, with the onset of Prohibition, their business model was decimated. While they survived through the sale of ice during that period, they never retained their status in the beer world. However their original building still stands today as one of the only 19th century commercial buildings in the city.

Marble is keeping the tradition alive in the downtown area, and we were lucky enough to get to try one of their brews. This beer, an IPA,  was really cloudy in the glass and had a distinct citrus fruity smell. It had a mild carbonation that was complimented with a smooth taste that made this a really drinkable beer. This was an enjoyable IPA, however the IPA category is a broad and deep, requiring something special to really stand out. While I recall not disliking this beer, it is hard for me to recall specific characteristics at this point to help it stand out from the many others I have tried over the year.

Thats all for New Mexico, next up is Arizona.

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Utah : This is Still the Right Place

Week 45 of this project, and we are trying some beer from Utah. Admitted to the union in 1896, Utah has a rich history in brewing, with many brewers setting up shop to cater to the burgeoning mining industry. While the onset of Prohibition killed off commercial brewing, just like all the other states, Utah provided the final vote ratifying the 21st Amendment. After a few starts and stops, the Utah brewing industry regained steam again in the mid 1980s, growing into what today is a large and successful craft brewing industry.

This week, there were three different selections from Utah. The first one we opened was a Nut Brown Ale from Red Rock Brewery called Bobcat.  Located in Salt Lake City, Red Rock Brewing opened in 1994 in what was at the time, the red light district of the city. Since then, the area around the brewery has become one of the hottest places in the city, and Red Rock has expanded their selection to over 45 different brews.

Utah Craft Beer

Bobcat Nut Brown Ale

The Bobcat was a very effervescent beer with lots of head that didn’t have any distinct taste. I find that the more effervescent beers loose their flavors to the carbon dioxide. Generally, when seeking out a flavorful beer, I tend to go for a lower carbonated beer. This beer was a fine beer, and better than many of the beer sampled over the course of this year, but it didn’t have any hooks to pull me into its world, leaving it slipping into the sea of other ok beers encountered during the project.

The next Utah beer we opened was an IPA. Over the course of the year, we encountered many different styles of IPAs. From the extremely hoppy almost undrinkable, to the more caramel and malty tasting breed, where the hops was just a subtle side note. This beer, a Double IPA called Hop Rising, from Squatters Brewery, fell into the latter category. Being a double, I was expecting a big hop flavor. Instead, this beer was sweet and loaded with caramel. Always surprising in an IPA.

Utah Craft Beer

Hop Rising Double IPA

The final beer of the evening was an Imperial Stout from Epic Brewing. Epic has three series of beers: The Classic series, a basic series of brews designed to introduce people to craft beer. An Elevated series that is their showcase series, demonstrating the talents of the brewer. And finally, the Exponential series, a special line of beer designed for the ever-curious. Our Imperial Stout was part of the Exponential series, and was definitely the standout of the evening. Full of chocolate flavors, this beer was rich in taste.

Utah Craft Beer

Imperial Stout from Epic Brewing

While in the glass, it was very flat looking, the sweet but complex smell quickly pulled you in, letting you know that this beer was going to be fun. In the end, this was my favorite beer of the night.

In the end, our little sampling of beer from Utah was pretty impressive, and gave us a nice peak into what is going on in Utah, and it tastes good.

Next post Oklahoma.

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Washington : Say WA!

While digging around the web to find something to put in this weeks post, I came upon the story of Bert Grant. Grant is credited with starting the first post-prohibition brewpub in the United States, back in 1982. Born in Scotland, Grant spent his formative years in Canada where he stared working in a brewery at the age of 16. Arriving in Yakima in 1967, Grant helped design and build a pelletizing operation for hops, before he finally opened his own brewery 15 years later. This pelletizing process was important for this region, and the craft beer industry.

Prior to the development of hops pellets, brewers had to rely on bales of whole hops. These bales were large and susceptible to spoilage. With the advent of the pellet, brewers could more easily store the hops, and had their brewing opportunities opened with the introduction of mixed hops pellets.

Washington presents as a craft beer state. From its Yakima valley, which comprising 75% of the total hops acreage in the U.S. and is one of the most productive hops production regions in the world, to its ranking of 8th nationally for breweries per capita. However when it came to locating beer from Washington, it was much harder than I expected. Because of that, we only had two different styles of beer to try  for this week.

washington craft beer

Two craft beers from Washington

 

The first beer of the evening was an Imperial IPA from Pyramid brewing called Outburst. Imperial, now a vague term meant to imply a stronger than normal beer, was originally intended for beer brewed for the crown heads of Europe. This beer, with its dark, golden honey color emitted a very sweet smell that carried over into its taste. In fact, it was one of the more sweeter IPAs we had this year.

The next, and final beer we cracked up was a barley wine. Known as the strongest of beers, barley wines are often 10% ABV and higher, and the one we had, Pike Old Bawdy, fell right on the mark with an ABV of 10%. With its Dark Red color, this beer was imposing. But the smell was even sweeter than the Outburst. With its thick mouth feel and sweet flavors, this beer was not something you would sit down and drink a glass of. It was a beer that would better complement a nice dessert.

With only two samples, we were presented with a really sweet introduction to the craft beer of Washington state. Given its strong history and importance to the brewing industry, getting the chance to try some beer from Washington was a fun experience.

Thanks for reading. Next post is Idaho.

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South Dakota : Great Faces. Great Places

Did you know that North Dakota and South Dakota became states on the same day? Me either. It was the only time in U.S. history that two news states joined the Union on the same day: November 2, 1889. Both of these states came from the Dakota Territory which formed in 1861.

While the brewing industry was sparse in North Dakota, its souther sister state had a much different story. The first records of breweries operating in South Dakota appear 12 years prior to statehood, in the town of Deadwood. Quickly growing to a population of 5000 people, after the discovery of gold, Deadwood also attracted entrepreneurs looking to capitalize on the needs of the prospectors.  With 23 saloons operating during the 1870s, there were multiple breweries satisfying their needs, such as Lead City, Black Hills and Central City to name just a few.

While South Dakota had a bustling pre-statehood brewing industry, one of the first laws passed in the new state was prohibition. This early attempt at prohibition lasted for 7 years, but it did little to stop the production and consumption of beer throughout the Black Hills. Because of this lack of enforcement, when the National Prohibition rolled around, the brewers expected the same level of enforcement. This was not the case however, and upon learning that they were about to get shutdown and had to dump their stock, one brewer took a proactive stance:

The manager, Schlichting, quickly alerted the area that drinks were “on the house.”  After giving away case after case of bottled beer, and allowing patrons to drink all they could, numerous kegs of beer still remained. So, they dumped the beer into Deadwood Creek. To this day, folks tell of the time the creek flowed with a foamy head. (source)

 

To commemorate the 40th state of the Union, we were able to try two different brews from Crow Peak Brewing in the city of Spearfish.

South Dakota Craft Beer

Crow Peak Brewing Co. Canyon Cream Ale and 11th Hour IPA

The first beer of the evening was a Canyon Cream Ale. This beer, which was very light in color, is listed on the brewers site as a light bodied ale, malty dominated with a slight sweet flavor. While I didn’t get the sweetness, which comes from local honey, I did enjoy the light and creamy taste of this beer. There wasn’t any one flavor that over powered this beer, making it something enjoyable and fun to drink. In fact, I just grabbed another one to keep me company as I write this post.

The second and final beer of the evening was also from Crow Peak. This beer was an IPA called the 11th Hour. This beer was quite hoppy, with a slight bitterness that remained for a bit after each sip. This beer too was well received for the evening.

In the end, we had a great time with these selections from South Dakota. And it was great learning a few things about the state along the way.

Short post this week, thanks for reading.

Next state is Montana.

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North Dakota : Legendary

As we approach the end of the year (and the end of this project), the official statehood date for each of the remaining states drifts further away from the founding days of our country. As a result, the beer industry history for these states becomes sparse, with a more modern focus. As Prohibition approached, it became harder for each new state to make a mark in brewing history.

For the states that had a well established pre-Probition brewing industry, the ability to restart at the end of prohibition was an easier task. However, for those states that did not have an established brewing industry, there were few influences  to help reverse the laws after the passing of the 21st amendment. For these states, the effects of Prohibition often lived on much longer than the law itself.

This week, we are celebrating the beer of North Dakota, a state that joined the Union in 1889. To put that into perspective, Adolphus Bush began brewing a light Bohemian lager called Budweiser 13 years earlier.

For North Dakota, the most noted early brewery in the state was the Dakota Malting and Brewing Company which operated from 1961 through 1965. At that point, the brewing industry in the country was transforming into a few large brewers.

When the Dakota Malting and Brewing Company closed up shop in 1965, no other brewer operated in the state until 2011. Issues such as distribution fees, production maximums, and residents (lack of) taste for craft beer were all major factors in this beer drought.  However a few intrepid home brewers decided end this era and share their hobby with the public.

One of those home brewers was Mike Frohlich, the co-owner of Laughing Sun Brewery which we were very lucky to have the opportunity to experience some beer from this week. Also joining us this week were some other folks also on a quest for the 50 state experience.

North Dakota Craft Beer

Laughing Sun does not bottle their beer, so this week you are reprieved from bad photos of beer bottles.

The first beer we cracked into was called Sinister Pear. Earlier in the year, we had a Prickly Pear beer from Shiner, but a prickly pear is a cactus, not a tree fruit, so this would be the first pear beer of the project. And the first pear beer anyone of us ever tried. In the glass, this beer was light golden and cloudy. The flavor was nicely balanced, with a slight hint of fruitiness from the pear. I was expecting a more powerful fruit taste, and was pleasantly surprised with subtleness of fruit in this beer. While it wasn’t a beer that you would sit around a fire and drink a six pack of (meaning it did not pass Dawne’s  Solo cup test), it was an interesting beer that was full of character.

Moving on from the Pear, we opened a Pale Ale called the 109. This beer was a golden honey color in the glass, a bit darker than I expected for a Pale Ale. It was also hoppier than a typical Pale Ale, which wasn’t a problem, but it was different. I would describe this beer as a typical ale that has a slight bitter finish. I really enjoyed it, would have drank more if I had it.

Very strawberry forward and wheat at the end

Next we tried a Strawberry Wheat. In the glass, this beer was really pale, and it had a distinct strawberry nose. This beer had mixed reactions around the table. Everyone enjoyed it, but there were comments that it reminded some folks (including me) of a childhood cereal. In the end, we deduced it might have been from the combination of the strawberry flavor mixed with the wheat. Two common cereal ingredients.

After the Strawberry Wheat, we opened up a Sultan’s Revenge. This beer, with its nice caramel color, was loaded with a piney hops smell. It was a very enjoyable beer that while super hoppy left no bitter after-taste. It was an all around favorite among the group.

And, we finished off the evening with a Porter called Black Shox Porter. This beer was all about the malt. It was the first thing you could smell in the glass, and it was right in front for the flavor. Presenting itself as a flavor mix of chocolate and coffee, this beer was mild but full of character and enjoyable flavors. There was no after-taste at all with this beer, making it rather pleasant to drink. More please.

North Dakota Craft Beer

Laughing Sun Brewery

In the end, we really enjoyed the beer from North Dakota, and are pulling for the craft beer industry in the state. Thanks for Eliane and Lee for joining us this week, we really enjoyed your company, and hope we furthered your quest for 50 states by a few more beers. Thanks to all the readers for tagging along again this week, and special thanks to the folks at Laughing Sun Brewery for making an enjoyable beer. We really enjoyed them.

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Minnesota : Land of 10,000 Lakes

This week, the 32nd week of this project brings the state of Minnesota into the United States, almost a full 8 years after the previous state, California. Prior to statehood, the capital of Minnesota, St. Paul existed as part of the Territory of Minnesota, and in 1849, Anthony Yoerg started the first brewery in the soon to be state. To help lager his beer, Anthony excavated cellars into the sandstone bluffs, and those cellars still exist today.

Another Minnesota brewery started around the birth of the new state was the August Schell Brewery. Founded in 1860, in New Ulm, the Schell Brewing Company is still operating today, as the 2nd oldest operating family brewery in the United States.

While Minnesota now has a wide variety of craft breweries, there is no access to any Minnesota beer in my state, so I had to resort to some trading to get my hands on some. After a successful trade, I was able to get myself four different beers from the state. Two from Surley Brewing and two from Summit Brewing Company.

Minnesota Craft Beer

Surly Brewing Cynic Ale

The first beer of the week was a Cynic Ale from Surley Brewing. This beer comes in a can, and the rim of the can says “Beer for a Glass, from a Can“. Poured in glass, this beer had a floral aroma that was not off putting. The taste was slightly sweet, and reminded me of a Fuller’s ESB, but not as sweet.

Minnesota Craft Beer

Summit Horizon Red Ale

After the Cynic Ale, I had two different selections from Summit Brewing Company. First was a Horizon Red Ale. This beer was a nice reddish color in the glass. The smell was fruity, and it had a hoppy taste, with a clean finish. This was a great beer, I would take more.

Next was a Summit Sága IPA. This beer had a strong pine aroma, and taste. It also had a strong, bitter aftertaste that wasn’t all that refreshing. Probably a great beer, but when drank alongside the Horizon, it didn’t stand up.

The final beer of the week was another brew from Surly. This one a coffee beer aptly named Coffee Bender. I really enjoyed this beer. The smell was distinctly of coffee, and the taste had a slight burnt taste to it, but it wasn’t a bad burnt taste. It was interesting and added to the overall character of the beer.

That wraps up week 32 and the state of Minnesota. Short post this week. Vacation week. Thanks for reading. Next week, Oregon.

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California : The Golden State

As the United States was one year shy of its Dodranscentennial, the area we now know as California became the 31st state in September, 1850. At the time of statehood, the brewing industry was well on its way, with the Adam Schuppert Brewery already established in the San Francisco region of the soon to be state. Supporting the onslaught of forty niners coming to the area to pan gold, San Francisco quickly became a brewing hotbed, and by 1852, the valley contained more than 350 operational bars and pubs1

Also around that time, California was establishing itself as a major supplier of hops for the brewing industry, and prior to the destruction of prohibition, Sonoma County was a major hops supplier. While now know better as a wine region, this county is still an important player in the beer ingredient chain.

Beer ingredients isn’t the only thing California is known for, it also holds claim to another beer history first. During the booming years of the early 1850s, lager beer was also sweeping across the country. In areas like St. Louis, and Wisconsin, brewers leveraged the geographical features (caves) of those areas to assist with the lagering process. However California does not have access to the caves that are under St. Louis, and with the advent of refrigeration for beer production still a few years away, California brewers had to make some adjustments. Using the bottom fermenting lager yeast, but allowing fermentation to occur at temperatures more common for ales, a new style of beer was born: Steam beer. These days, steam beer is associated with Anchor Brewing (due to trademark,) but there are others out there, brewed under the category of California common beer.

This week, we didn’t have any common beer in our tasting selection, but we did have a nice (very small) variety of beer from the state. Many of them very interesting.

California Craft Beer

We started the week off with an Hop Ottin’ IPA from Anderson Valley Brewing Company. This beer we drank straight from the can, and it was good. The day was hot, not too hot, but hot enough to really enjoy an IPA, and this one did the trick. It had a really nice hoppy flavor and finished slightly bitter, but the bitter quickly went away, leaving no bitter aftertaste. I would buy this beer again.

California Craft BeerKeeping the week rolling, a few days later, we opened a Sierra Nevada Torpedo Extra IPA. This beer had a piney aroma when opened, and it was stronger hopped than their more popular Pale Ale. This was my first time drinking this beer, and I liked it. It was well received across the tasting party, and our special guest Pete gave it two thumbs up. I wouldn’t be surprised if he buys it again.

Moving on from the Torpedo, we ventured into more extreme waters. Much like the wide ranging state they represent, the California beers of the day covered a variety of styles and flavors.

We started our extreme adventure with a beer from The Bruery in Orange County. From The Bruery, we had a beer from their special collection called Sour in the Rye. An

California craft beer

The Bruery, Sour in the Rye

unfiltered, bottle-conditioned brew, this one generated some commentary. In the glass, this beer was a nice honey color and had a sweet aroma. The taste was unique. With a strong lemon finish, and sour notes throughout, everyone had something to say about this beer. While we were tasting, I read out loud the description from the brewers website:

We brewed this ale with around 40% rye as a base malt and let our sour yeast and bacteria eat away at it in oak barrels for over a year creating a sour ale with a complex character of rye spice, oak and a subtle funk.

and quickly got the response of: “Not sure the funk is all that subtle!” We also tried this beer with some spicy food, and found it really changed the flavor of the beer, but for me, it also damped down the interesting flavors and wasn’t as enjoyable. This brewery is going on my watch list. I must try more of their stuff.

Between the Sour in the Rye and the next beer, Joel commented that this year, we have encountered three different types of beer:

  • Good
  • Industrial
  • Different

I think I agree, and we are about to add another to the different category. Following the Sour in the Rye, we opened a beer from 21st Amendment called Monks Blood (no link on the brewers site).

California Craft Beer

Monks Blood

This beer, brewed with figs, oak chips, vanilla and cinnamon, was the most unique of the night. I really enjoyed this beer, but I was alone in that group. This is not a beer you are going to sit and drink 2 or 3 of. With its thick mouthfeel and sweet smell, this is something you sip over a duration. Others felt it was a dessert beer, and I could see that. The fig taste was subtle, and the tail end of the taste. Unique and full of character.

Keeping the day rolling, we opened a Lagunitas Lucky 13 and a Cappuccino Stout.

California craft beer

Selection of Lagunita’s beer

The Lucky 13 had a strong piney smell as Joel described “Beat over the head with the pine.” This was true. I enjoyed the pine at first, but after a few sips, the pine overpowered everything else and took over the beer. The Cappuccino Stout was a nice, well rounded stout. It had a distinct chocolate smell and a wonderful coffee taste. Another great coffee beer.

Later in the week, I discovered a Stone RuinTen in my stock. That was a nice surprise, for a mid-week beer.

That wraps up a (late) California post. Next week, Minnesota.

1 The Oxford Companion to Beer

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Wisconsin: Live like you mean it

There was in the United States, in the beer age, no more delightful a city than Milwaukee in which to spend a day, a year or a life.1

By the time Wisconsin gained statehood in 1848, it was already well on its way to becoming a major brewing center. Eight years prior to statehood, the Lake Brewery in Milwaukee began brewing traditional English ales and porters. While these styles were well loved among the English, their sweet taste and murky color were not what the German’s called beer. Within a year, the Germans would get their beer, when a German immigrant named Reuthlisberger founded the lager beer industry in Milwaukee, setting the course of the city for years to come.

The Germans brought with them their love of relaxation, beer and talk.1

Around 1844, the first big wave of German immigrants started migrating to the United States, with many of them settling in region that would become Wisconsin. One of the newly transplanted was Jacob Best. Prior to coming across the Atlantic, Jacob ran a small brewery in Germany, so when he arrived in Wisconsin, he picked up right where he left off by founding the Empire Brewery which later became the Pabst Brewing Company. Quickly, other beer barons with names like Schlitz and Blatz also set up shop brewing lager, making the city Milwaukee synonymous with the word beer.

Pour beer out upon a locality and it won’t be long till the ground is dotted with gardens. They will grow and bloom so long as the beer continues to nourish them.1

Along with the their love of lager, the German immigrants also brought another facet of home with them, the beer garden, a gathering place for all.  One of the most famous beer gardens not only in Milwaukee, but in the entire United States at one point in time, was the Schlitz Palm Garden. Opened in 1896, The Schlitz Garden, built when “The Beer That Made Milwaukee Famous” was sweeping the land, quickly became a major tourist attraction for the city, including a visit from Woodrow Wilson on his first presidential nomination campaign.

Beer and wine make for conversation. There is in liquors of mild alcoholic persuasion that which quickens the flow of the thoughts in a man’s cranium, loosens a notch the belt about his reticence and releases upon his tongue the fruits of his meditations1

While the German’s were busying putting their own mark on Milwaukee with the introduction of lager beer and beer gardens, there was a steadily growing temperance movement sweeping across the U.S., and within Wisconsin, that would bring about another, much resisted, change to the city.

Wisconsin to the average American unacquainted with actual conditions therein, is commonly regarded as a Gibraltar of the wets — sort of a Utopia where everybody drinks their fill and John Barlycorn still holds forth in splendor2

Prohibition in the United States lasted from 1920 to 1933 with some areas embracing it more than others. Wisconsin was not one of the more embracing states. In 1931, just two years shy of the 21st Amendment, The Treasury Department conducted a survey of Prohibition enforcement in the state of Wisconsin and found that a majority of the state was doing little to uphold the federal law. In most instances, the enforcement of Prohibition was just theater as indicated by this paragraph in the report: The writer attended police court in Superior and observed the daily collection therein from proprietors of such establishments. The line formed on the right. The violator stepped up to the judge, was asked whether he pleaded guilty or not guilty to the sale of intoxicating liquor in his particular soft-drink establishment. Before the judge had finished with the above question, the proprietor in each case would reach into his pocket, extract therefrom a roll of bills, plead guilty, and place $200 on the desk. This is the standard penalty for liquor transgressions in the city of Superior.2

However, even with flagrant disregard of the law in many parts of the state, Prohibition still made its mark. Just one year into Prohibition, the Schlitz Garden closed, ending a 25 year run of the most successful beer garden in the United States.

Once prohibition ended, the major players bounced back and regained their foothold,  quickly regaining their leading positions of producers of beer in the country. While Wisconsin was once the home to many major national breweries, things appear to be different these days, as we were only able to get our hands on one craft brewery here in Massachusetts for this weeks tasting: Lakefront Brewery.

From Lakefront Brewery, we tried 5 different styles.

Wisconsin Craft Beer

Wisconsin Craft Beer

We opened the Fixed Gear, an American Red Ale, to start the evening.

Brewed in Milwaukee for people who like beer

This beer had a deep red color when poured in the glass. The taste was caramel, with a slightly bitter aftertaste. Nothing off putting at all. This beer won two awards, The Regional Champion at the Winter U.S. Beer Tasting Championship and the Silver Medal at the Los Angels International Commercial Beer Competition, and I am not surprised. This was a nice, solid beer and I would drink it again.

Wisconsin Craft Beer

Lakefront Brewery Wisonsinite

After the Fixed Gear, we opened the Wisconsinite, a summer Weiss. The concept of this beer, brewed with 100 percent Wisconsin grown ingredients intrigued me. This is an idea I have always been curious about, can a beer have a sense of place? Do the locally grown ingredients give the beer a regional taste that can not be reproduced when using the same ingredients in a different area. In wine and coffee, this is referred to as terroir, and the debate still carries on about terroir in beer.

In the glass, this beer was a light golden color. The aroma had a slight banana characteristic, which is expected in a hefeweizen. The aroma stems from the yeast used to brew the beer which produces the same esters found in bananas.

When drank, this beer didn’t really have anything that made it standout. No flavors jumped out at me, and I was left wanting of a description. This beer reminded me of a session beer, and with its 4.4 ABV, it meets the criteria. While not a bad beer, it was just not loaded with the flavors that we have often encountered over the past year, but as a session beer, I could handle a few of these.

Our next beer was the Cream City Pale Ale. Milwaukee is nicknamed the Cream City for the cream colored bricks used as a common building material in the area. The color of this beer was golden honey (not cream!), and the beer had a slightly bitter aftertaste. Other than that, there were no other descriptives I could come up with for this beer.

Finishing up the Cream City, we moved to the IPA and followed that with the IBA.

Wisconsin Craft Beer

Lakefront IPA

The IPA, while not emitting much of a smell, had that nice, enjoyable bitter taste expected in an IPA. I felt the carbonation of this beer overpowered the ability to get any aroma from it, otherwise, this was a typical, good IPA.

The IBA (Black IPA) was a nice, roasted dark color and wasn’t as bitter as the IPA. With its roasted tastes and bitter hops, this was my favorite beer of the night.

In the end, I enjoyed the Fixed Gear and the IBA the best. The others were fine, but they seemed lacking in character and didn’t have the uniqueness that some of the beers we have encountered on this journey have exhibited. Overall, another successful week was had putting us at 136 beers from 30 states in 30 weeks.

Next week, California. Thanks for reading.

1 http://www.wisconsinhistory.org/turningpoints/search.asp?id=1270
2 http://content.wisconsinhistory.org/cdm/ref/collection/tp/id/48320

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Iowa : Fields of Opportunities

Iowa became the 29th state in 1846, and less than a year later, a temperance movement was starting to gain traction in the state. Over the course of the next 70 years, various levels of prohibition existed in the state, until 1916 when a statewide prohibition took effect, two years prior to the national prohibition.

While Iowa battled on and off with a ban on alcohol, a few intrepid (and a few corrupt) individuals paved a path to brewing in the state. In 1859, John Kohl, along with two partners built the Minnie Creek Brewery in Anamosa city, with a statewide prohibition having ended just two years prior. The building still stands today and is listed in the National Historic Register as one of the few remaining example of early Iowan industry.

Like the rest of the country, Iowa has come around on its stand towards prohibition. After leading the way to Prohibition, the residents of the state voted for the repeal of the 18th Amendment in 1933. Today, craft beer is a part of the Iowan culture, with a craft beer tent now part of the Iowa State Fair.

This week, in the middle of our second heatwave in 3 weeks, we were able to get a slight break in a nice air conditioned space while we sampled 4 different brews from Iowa. One from Peace Tree Brewing, 1 from Backpocket Brewing, and 2 from Millstream Brewing.

Iowa Craft Beer

Iowa Craft Beer

We started the night off with the flagship brew from Millstream Brewery,  a Schild Brau Amber. This beer is a Lager “brewed in the style of a Vienna Lager“, a style that originated in Austria, but is more prominently made in North America with Sam Adams Boston Lager and Dos Equis leading the pack.

In the glass, the Schild Brau Amber was a nice golden honey / copper color, typical for this style of beer. Initially, the aroma was lacking, however after it warmed up a bit, I was getting hints of some interesting spices that reminded me of celery seeds. The taste of this beer was interesting and had more character than some of the leaders of this style. While it had a slightly sweet taste, it wasn’t too much and it didn’t linger, making this a sort of refreshing beer.

Iowa Craft Beer

Backpocket Brewery Slingshot

Moving on from the lager, we next opened the Slingshot Dunkel from Backpocket Brewing.

In 1516, the German Purity Law, or Reinheitsgebot originated, restricting the ingredients of beer to: water, barley and hops (in the 1800s, yeast was included). The Slingshot Dunkel, a dark German lager, adheres to the Reinheitsgebot.

Dunkel means dark in German, and in the glass, this beer lives up to its name. This beer had a minimal noise, with no distinguishing characteristics, and the taste was slightly smokey. Generating comments like, “this would be good with food” and “needs a Brat on the grill”, this beer was enjoyable, but felt more like a fall beer, not something to drink on a hot day. 

This beer won for the best label of the day. With its matte finish and simple color scheme, this label was one of the best we have seen recently and we were interested in seeing what else this brewery had.

From the Slingshot, we went back to another beer from Millstream Brewery, this time a

Iowa Craft Beer

Millstream Brewery Back Road Stout

stout. The Back Road Stout is brewed with 5% oatmeal in the milled grain, or grist, and that oatmeal stands out in the mouthfeel of this beer giving it a thick, roasted taste. The color of this beer was typical dark stout and it had a nice sweet and smokey aroma. Over this course of this project, I have enjoyed many nice stouts, and this one is up there with the enjoyable ones.

The final beer of the night was from Peace Tree Brewing. Named after a 500 year old Sycamore tree, near the town of Red Rock, Peace Tree has a line of 4 regular brews and we had their Hop Wrangler. The Hop Wrangler is a multinational take on an IPA. This beer had a real heady pour, and was dark for an IPA. In the glass, it had a real fruity smell, with hints of lemons, oranges and tangerines. On the tongue, this beer was all carbonation. Too much carbonation for my taste. The finish was quite bitter. Starting off with an interesting aroma full of multiple citrus flavors, this beer was a let down with its over carbonation and bitter aftertaste.

Overall, we enjoyed our little voyage into Iowa without have to leave New England. From our little sampling, it is clear there is some interesting brewing occurring in the state and I look forward to experiencing more. Come back next week for Wisconsin.

Iowa Craft Beer

Peace Tree Hop Wrangler

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