beer, History

Utah : This is Still the Right Place

Week 45 of this project, and we are trying some beer from Utah. Admitted to the union in 1896, Utah has a rich history in brewing, with many brewers setting up shop to cater to the burgeoning mining industry. While the onset of Prohibition killed off commercial brewing, just like all the other states, Utah provided the final vote ratifying the 21st Amendment. After a few starts and stops, the Utah brewing industry regained steam again in the mid 1980s, growing into what today is a large and successful craft brewing industry.

This week, there were three different selections from Utah. The first one we opened was a Nut Brown Ale from Red Rock Brewery called Bobcat.  Located in Salt Lake City, Red Rock Brewing opened in 1994 in what was at the time, the red light district of the city. Since then, the area around the brewery has become one of the hottest places in the city, and Red Rock has expanded their selection to over 45 different brews.

Utah Craft Beer

Bobcat Nut Brown Ale

The Bobcat was a very effervescent beer with lots of head that didn’t have any distinct taste. I find that the more effervescent beers loose their flavors to the carbon dioxide. Generally, when seeking out a flavorful beer, I tend to go for a lower carbonated beer. This beer was a fine beer, and better than many of the beer sampled over the course of this year, but it didn’t have any hooks to pull me into its world, leaving it slipping into the sea of other ok beers encountered during the project.

The next Utah beer we opened was an IPA. Over the course of the year, we encountered many different styles of IPAs. From the extremely hoppy almost undrinkable, to the more caramel and malty tasting breed, where the hops was just a subtle side note. This beer, a Double IPA called Hop Rising, from Squatters Brewery, fell into the latter category. Being a double, I was expecting a big hop flavor. Instead, this beer was sweet and loaded with caramel. Always surprising in an IPA.

Utah Craft Beer

Hop Rising Double IPA

The final beer of the evening was an Imperial Stout from Epic Brewing. Epic has three series of beers: The Classic series, a basic series of brews designed to introduce people to craft beer. An Elevated series that is their showcase series, demonstrating the talents of the brewer. And finally, the Exponential series, a special line of beer designed for the ever-curious. Our Imperial Stout was part of the Exponential series, and was definitely the standout of the evening. Full of chocolate flavors, this beer was rich in taste.

Utah Craft Beer

Imperial Stout from Epic Brewing

While in the glass, it was very flat looking, the sweet but complex smell quickly pulled you in, letting you know that this beer was going to be fun. In the end, this was my favorite beer of the night.

In the end, our little sampling of beer from Utah was pretty impressive, and gave us a nice peak into what is going on in Utah, and it tastes good.

Next post Oklahoma.

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beer, History

Nevada : Wide Open

On October 31, 1864, eight days before Abraham Lincoln was re-elected for a second term, Nevada became the 36th state, and this week we will be celebrating the 36th state with some beer from Tenaya Creek Brewery.

Nevada Craft Beer

Nevada Craft Beer — Tenaya Creek

The first known brewery in Nevada, the Carson City Brewing Company was established in 1860. Originally brewing steam beer, the brewery switched to brewing lager in 1913. But that wouldn’t last long, as the state of Nevada started prohibition in 1919, killing most of the breweries in the state. But Carson City Brewing was able to stay afloat during the prohibition years brewing near beer. At the end of Prohibition, Carson City Brewing was back up and running, and they would continue brewing their famous lager Tahoe Beer until 1948 when the brewery finally succumbed to the competition of the much larger national brewers that were taking over the industry.

Another brewery, the Reno Brewing Company would hold off the National brands for another nine years, producing its last batch of beer 1957. It would take 30 years for another brewery to open in Nevada, with the Union Brewery, opening in 1987 paving the way for a new era of beer and brewing in the state.

To experience what is going on in Nevada, we got our hands on two bottles of beer from Tenaya Creek Brewery. The first bottle came from The Beer Babe, the other was from an old high school friend who now lives in Arizona.

Nevada Craft Beer

Tenaya Creek Imperial Stout

The first beer we opened from Tenaya Creek was an Imperial Stout. This stout, originally brewed in London for export to the Russia and Baltic countries was the beer provided to the imperial court of Catherine the Great, where it gained its Imperial moniker.

Our stout, a limited special release, was bottled on 12/12/12. Aged! This bottle was protected with a thick wax seal that took some effort to get opened, but the end result was well worth it. With its chocolate smell, and taste, mixed with some great malty flavors, this was a great beer. There was a hint of bitterness on the tail end, a product of the large amount of hops typically used in this style of beer. Joel rated it as a top 10 for the year on his list, and I totally agree.

After the Imperial Stout, we opened the Old Jackalope, a limited release barley wine. In the glass, this beer had a very sweet smell. The taste was sweet too, maybe a little too sweet. Of course, anything following that Imperial Stout was in for trouble.

In the end, we really enjoyed Tenaya Creek, and if I ever get to Vegas, I will be sure to pick up a few more selections from this brewery.

Thanks again to Beer Babe and Matt for getting us some beer from Nevada. We appreciated it.

Thanks for reading. Next week we will be drinking some beer from Nebraska.

Since we opened with a link to Abraham Lincoln, we will end with a quote from him.

 I am a firm believer in the people. If given the truth, they can be depended upon to meet any national crisis. The great point is to bring them the real facts, and beer.
— Abraham Lincoln

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