beer, History

Alaska : North to the Future

From Alaska, we were able to get our hands on 3 different brews, all from Anchorage Brewing Company, and each of these brews were unique in their own way.

Alaska Craft Beer

Bitter Monk, Belgian Style IPA from Anchorage Brewing Company

The first beer we had from Alaska was called a Belgian IPA called Bitter Monk. This was the first IPA we had that was brewed with Brettanomyces, and it was amazing. This beer started with a huge citrus smell, like a glass of grapefruit juice, and it tasted amazing. At first I was worried. Between the Brettanomyces, the Belgian-style IPA and its aging in Chardonnay barrels, there were many places for this beer to go wrong, but it never did. Instead, it was an incredibly unique beer that I will not forget anytime soon.

Moving on from the Bitter Monk, we opened another bomber from Anchorage Brewing. This one an Imperial Stout called Darkest Hour. This is another beer that appears to have had the kitchen sink thrown at it.

Alaska Craft Beer

Darkest Hour Imperial Stout from Anchorage Brewing

Triple fermented, aged in two different barrels, first a Pinot Noir barrel, then a Rye whiskey barrel, and finally bottle conditioned with a wine yeast. Again, like the Bitter Monk, this beer had plenty of opportunities to go wrong, and just like the Bitter Monk it never did.

From the bottle to the glass, this beer poured like syrup. It was dark in color and smelled of chocolate and coffee, with hints of rye and pinot noir from the barrels. With its strong chocolate and coffee flavors, this beer is clearly a coffee beer. It was very sweet tasting, with a slight grainy mouthfeel reminiscent of Mexican chocolate. The character of this beer was amazing, and the flavors were complex. The only issue we kept coming back to was the smell. There was something strange with the mixture of all that was going on that interfered with everything else, keeping us from truly loving this brew. Still, it was one of the best beers of the year.

Alaska Craft Beer

Anadromous Black Sour Ale from Anchorage Brewing

The final beer from Anchorage brewing was a Black Sour Ale called Anadromous. Wow, this was yet another amazing beer from Anchorage. I loved the sour taste, and the complex fruit flavors.

This week, we got our hands on three different brews from Anchorage, and they were all special. There is clearly something amazing going on up in Alaska.

One more post, and 50 states have been covered. Next up Hawaii.

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beer, History

Idaho : Great Potatoes. Tasty Destinations

Idaho, commonly known for its potatoes, has a rich mining tradition. Almost every important mineral except oil, gas and coal can be found in Idaho. And it is this rich supply of minerals that brought migrants to the state in the mid 1800s. By the 1860s, Idaho was producing 19% of the gold in the United States. With this burgeoning mining industry came services to support the miners. These services included not only banks, bakers and hardware stores, but also brewers. By the time Idaho became a state in 1890, there were at least 33 breweries operating across the new state. The brewing industry lasted in the state until the onset of Prohibition, which came to Idaho in 1916. By 1933, when the dark cloud of Prohibition was lifted, no breweries remained in the state.

These days, the brewing tradition has returned to the state, and we were able to get our hands on a few selections from one of these new brewers. This week from Idaho, we had three different Imperial beers from Laughing Dog Brewing.

idaho craft beer

This weeks selection from Idaho consisted of three Imperial brews from Laughing Dog.

The first beer was an Imperial IPA called Sneaky Pete. This beer was very sweet and fruity with a bitter after-taste. What was interesting, was that for an IPA, the malt was the dominant smell, not the hops, making it unique in that respect.

After the IPA, we opened an Imperial Stout called The Dogfather. This stout poured like tar, and for me, that is a good thing. I really enjoy a thick, hearty stout. This beer was dark too, almost black, and it had a sweet malty taste that reminded one of the tasters of root beer. I too got that hint of root beer, but I also tasted hints of bourbon, from the barrel aged, but the bourbon was not as strong as previous beers. The after-taste of this beer was sweet chocolate.

The final beer of the evening, also from Laughing Dog was an Imperial Coffee Porter called Anubis. This beer had a slight sour smell and was much more mellow than the stout.

Again, another great week was had, and Idaho represented well. Next post is Wyoming.

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beer, History

Minnesota : Land of 10,000 Lakes

This week, the 32nd week of this project brings the state of Minnesota into the United States, almost a full 8 years after the previous state, California. Prior to statehood, the capital of Minnesota, St. Paul existed as part of the Territory of Minnesota, and in 1849, Anthony Yoerg started the first brewery in the soon to be state. To help lager his beer, Anthony excavated cellars into the sandstone bluffs, and those cellars still exist today.

Another Minnesota brewery started around the birth of the new state was the August Schell Brewery. Founded in 1860, in New Ulm, the Schell Brewing Company is still operating today, as the 2nd oldest operating family brewery in the United States.

While Minnesota now has a wide variety of craft breweries, there is no access to any Minnesota beer in my state, so I had to resort to some trading to get my hands on some. After a successful trade, I was able to get myself four different beers from the state. Two from Surley Brewing and two from Summit Brewing Company.

Minnesota Craft Beer

Surly Brewing Cynic Ale

The first beer of the week was a Cynic Ale from Surley Brewing. This beer comes in a can, and the rim of the can says “Beer for a Glass, from a Can“. Poured in glass, this beer had a floral aroma that was not off putting. The taste was slightly sweet, and reminded me of a Fuller’s ESB, but not as sweet.

Minnesota Craft Beer

Summit Horizon Red Ale

After the Cynic Ale, I had two different selections from Summit Brewing Company. First was a Horizon Red Ale. This beer was a nice reddish color in the glass. The smell was fruity, and it had a hoppy taste, with a clean finish. This was a great beer, I would take more.

Next was a Summit Sága IPA. This beer had a strong pine aroma, and taste. It also had a strong, bitter aftertaste that wasn’t all that refreshing. Probably a great beer, but when drank alongside the Horizon, it didn’t stand up.

The final beer of the week was another brew from Surly. This one a coffee beer aptly named Coffee Bender. I really enjoyed this beer. The smell was distinctly of coffee, and the taste had a slight burnt taste to it, but it wasn’t a bad burnt taste. It was interesting and added to the overall character of the beer.

That wraps up week 32 and the state of Minnesota. Short post this week. Vacation week. Thanks for reading. Next week, Oregon.

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beer, History

California : The Golden State

As the United States was one year shy of its Dodranscentennial, the area we now know as California became the 31st state in September, 1850. At the time of statehood, the brewing industry was well on its way, with the Adam Schuppert Brewery already established in the San Francisco region of the soon to be state. Supporting the onslaught of forty niners coming to the area to pan gold, San Francisco quickly became a brewing hotbed, and by 1852, the valley contained more than 350 operational bars and pubs1

Also around that time, California was establishing itself as a major supplier of hops for the brewing industry, and prior to the destruction of prohibition, Sonoma County was a major hops supplier. While now know better as a wine region, this county is still an important player in the beer ingredient chain.

Beer ingredients isn’t the only thing California is known for, it also holds claim to another beer history first. During the booming years of the early 1850s, lager beer was also sweeping across the country. In areas like St. Louis, and Wisconsin, brewers leveraged the geographical features (caves) of those areas to assist with the lagering process. However California does not have access to the caves that are under St. Louis, and with the advent of refrigeration for beer production still a few years away, California brewers had to make some adjustments. Using the bottom fermenting lager yeast, but allowing fermentation to occur at temperatures more common for ales, a new style of beer was born: Steam beer. These days, steam beer is associated with Anchor Brewing (due to trademark,) but there are others out there, brewed under the category of California common beer.

This week, we didn’t have any common beer in our tasting selection, but we did have a nice (very small) variety of beer from the state. Many of them very interesting.

California Craft Beer

We started the week off with an Hop Ottin’ IPA from Anderson Valley Brewing Company. This beer we drank straight from the can, and it was good. The day was hot, not too hot, but hot enough to really enjoy an IPA, and this one did the trick. It had a really nice hoppy flavor and finished slightly bitter, but the bitter quickly went away, leaving no bitter aftertaste. I would buy this beer again.

California Craft BeerKeeping the week rolling, a few days later, we opened a Sierra Nevada Torpedo Extra IPA. This beer had a piney aroma when opened, and it was stronger hopped than their more popular Pale Ale. This was my first time drinking this beer, and I liked it. It was well received across the tasting party, and our special guest Pete gave it two thumbs up. I wouldn’t be surprised if he buys it again.

Moving on from the Torpedo, we ventured into more extreme waters. Much like the wide ranging state they represent, the California beers of the day covered a variety of styles and flavors.

We started our extreme adventure with a beer from The Bruery in Orange County. From The Bruery, we had a beer from their special collection called Sour in the Rye. An

California craft beer

The Bruery, Sour in the Rye

unfiltered, bottle-conditioned brew, this one generated some commentary. In the glass, this beer was a nice honey color and had a sweet aroma. The taste was unique. With a strong lemon finish, and sour notes throughout, everyone had something to say about this beer. While we were tasting, I read out loud the description from the brewers website:

We brewed this ale with around 40% rye as a base malt and let our sour yeast and bacteria eat away at it in oak barrels for over a year creating a sour ale with a complex character of rye spice, oak and a subtle funk.

and quickly got the response of: “Not sure the funk is all that subtle!” We also tried this beer with some spicy food, and found it really changed the flavor of the beer, but for me, it also damped down the interesting flavors and wasn’t as enjoyable. This brewery is going on my watch list. I must try more of their stuff.

Between the Sour in the Rye and the next beer, Joel commented that this year, we have encountered three different types of beer:

  • Good
  • Industrial
  • Different

I think I agree, and we are about to add another to the different category. Following the Sour in the Rye, we opened a beer from 21st Amendment called Monks Blood (no link on the brewers site).

California Craft Beer

Monks Blood

This beer, brewed with figs, oak chips, vanilla and cinnamon, was the most unique of the night. I really enjoyed this beer, but I was alone in that group. This is not a beer you are going to sit and drink 2 or 3 of. With its thick mouthfeel and sweet smell, this is something you sip over a duration. Others felt it was a dessert beer, and I could see that. The fig taste was subtle, and the tail end of the taste. Unique and full of character.

Keeping the day rolling, we opened a Lagunitas Lucky 13 and a Cappuccino Stout.

California craft beer

Selection of Lagunita’s beer

The Lucky 13 had a strong piney smell as Joel described “Beat over the head with the pine.” This was true. I enjoyed the pine at first, but after a few sips, the pine overpowered everything else and took over the beer. The Cappuccino Stout was a nice, well rounded stout. It had a distinct chocolate smell and a wonderful coffee taste. Another great coffee beer.

Later in the week, I discovered a Stone RuinTen in my stock. That was a nice surprise, for a mid-week beer.

That wraps up a (late) California post. Next week, Minnesota.

1 The Oxford Companion to Beer

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beer, History

Missouri : Close to Home. Far from ordinary.

Johnny Hymer was a miner always on the job,
Johnny loved his lager like a sailor loves his grog.
One day his foreman told him that this country would go dry,
John threw his tools upon the ground,
You should have heard him cry.
No Beer, No Work. 1919

In 1803, Thomas Jefferson made the largest land grab in United States history when he completed the Louisiana Purchase. Part of that acquisition was a block of land that is now the state of Missouri. Known as the Gateway to the West, Missouri, was the starting point for western exploration, including the Louis and Clark Expedition. Eighteen years after the Louisiana Purchase, Missouri would become the 24th state, and this week’s featured state.

In the early 1930s, a St. Louis lawyer named Luther Ely Smith, wanting to commemorate St. Louis’ role in westward expansion, pitched an idea for a memorial. Over the course of the next 30 years, The Gateway Arch would come to fruition, and in the process become the largest man-made monument in the United States. Located on the west bank of the Mississippi River, which played a critical role in western expansion, The Gateway Arch also has a physical connection to American brewing history.

In 1838, a German immigrant, Johann Adam Lemp came to St. Louis and opened a grocery store. In addition to groceries, Lemp, a master brewer back in Germany, sold his own brewed beer and vinegar. It wasn’t long before beer became his primary product, and in 1840, the Lemp Brewery was established. Starting out brewing ales, the brewery soon took advantage of the natural caves around St. Louis perfect for lagering, and became the first commercial lager brewer in the country.

St. Louis is also know for another national brewer, Anheuser-Busch. Started about a decade after Lemp, Anheuser-Busch quickly grew through multiple acquisitions and various price fixing schemes. And it wouldn’t take long for this fast growing brewery to eclipse Lemp Brewery. However Lemp and Anheuser-Busch remained the most prominent brewers in the state for a few decades, producing a majority of the 61 million gallons of beer brewed in St. Louis in 1892.

The Lemp Brewing Company would not survive prohibition, and by the 1960s, Anheuser-Busch would become one of the few operating breweries in the United States. But the Lemp brewing legacy will always live on in Missouri, as part of the land acquired for building the Arch was also the site of the original Lemp brewery.

While Anheuser-Busch would continue to dominate the St. Louis beer scene throughout the 60s and 70s, during the 1980s American would start to see a new growth in the beer industry. One of those new companies looking to reintroduce flavorful beer to the country is Boulevard Brewing Company. Founded in 1989, Boulevard has grown from its original business plan of 6000 barrels a year to a current 600,000 barrels a year. This week, we will be sampling a very small portion of those 600k barrels in the form of 5 different and interesting styles.

Missouri Craft Beer - Boulvard Brewing

Missouri Craft Beer – Boulvard Brewing

Boulevard is not the only brewery operating in Missouri today, but they are the only brewery I have easy access to here in New England. Their Tank 7 and The Sixth Glass are common sights on the shelves of many local beer stores, so we grabbed a bottle of each, and found a few others, and set out for a celebration of Missouri.

We started the evening off with Tank 7, a Saison, or Farmhouse Ale. In the glass, this beer was slightly cloudy, with a nice pale straw color. It just called out as light and refreshing, with its Amarillo hops exuding a nice, citrus aroma. The taste of this beer, slightly bitter with a dry finish, was well loved by everyone at the tasting party. While not the best Saison I have ever had, it sure is up their in the rankings, making this a beer I would come back to again.

After the Tank 7, we switched to a beer named The Sixth Glass, named after a Hans Christian Anderson Story.

The sixth glass! In that sits Satan himself—a well-dressed, conversable, lively, fascinating little man—who never contradicts you, allows that you are always in the right—in fact, seems quite to adopt all your opinions.
                                        Olê, the Watchman of the Tower

Missouri Craft Beer

Boulevard, The Sixth Glass

In the glass, The Sixth Glass looked beautiful, with its frothy head, and nice, caramel color. The aroma of this beer was sweet and fruity, with a slight burnt smell. While this beer presented well across the group, the taste was not enjoyed as much. Two of the four people participating, opted out of finishing this beer. One taster even went so far as calling it flabby.

From The Sixth Glass, we moved into the IPAs, the first being Boulevard’s Single Wide. Containing six varieties of hops, this beer has a lot going on. Each taster got a different aroma profile from this beer. Some picking up the citrus aromas of the Cascade hops, while others quickly detected the piney aromas of the Simcoe hops. In the glass, this beer has a nice, pale gold color with a bubbly, carbonated body. The aftertaste of this beer was clearly hops, which was expected given the number of varieties used in this brew. Overall, this beer was well liked.

The next beer of the evening was another IPA, this one called Double Wide. A Double IPA, we expected the hops in this beer to come off much stronger than the Single Wide. However we were wrong in that assumption. This beer, also brewed with 5 different varieties of hops, was darker than the Single Wide. And that darker color came through in the flavor as well, dampening the hops, and letting the malty caramel flavors come forward. In an IPA, I prefer hops, from start to finish. So with this beer, it was unexpected to have the more caramel malt taste dominate the palate. In that respect, I didn’t enjoy this beer as much as the Single Wide.

Missouri Craft Beer

Boulevard Coffee Ale

The final beer of the night was a Coffee Ale. A limited release beer, this brew joins the ranks of the coffee beers that have been one of the pleasant surprises of this project. We have been surprised at the number of beer / coffee collaborations we have encountered this year, with each one presenting a unique character. The Coffee Ale was no different. As with all of the coffee beers we have sampled this year, this beer has a nice spicy, coffee aroma. Everyone loved this beer. It tastes just like coffee! and it quickly generated ideas for recipes. This would make a great Red-eye gravy! In the end, this was another well loved beer, rounding out another great tasting week.

Thanks Boulevard, and Missouri for keeping the craft beer tradition alive.

Next week, Arkansas.

 

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