beer, History

Idaho : Great Potatoes. Tasty Destinations

Idaho, commonly known for its potatoes, has a rich mining tradition. Almost every important mineral except oil, gas and coal can be found in Idaho. And it is this rich supply of minerals that brought migrants to the state in the mid 1800s. By the 1860s, Idaho was producing 19% of the gold in the United States. With this burgeoning mining industry came services to support the miners. These services included not only banks, bakers and hardware stores, but also brewers. By the time Idaho became a state in 1890, there were at least 33 breweries operating across the new state. The brewing industry lasted in the state until the onset of Prohibition, which came to Idaho in 1916. By 1933, when the dark cloud of Prohibition was lifted, no breweries remained in the state.

These days, the brewing tradition has returned to the state, and we were able to get our hands on a few selections from one of these new brewers. This week from Idaho, we had three different Imperial beers from Laughing Dog Brewing.

idaho craft beer

This weeks selection from Idaho consisted of three Imperial brews from Laughing Dog.

The first beer was an Imperial IPA called Sneaky Pete. This beer was very sweet and fruity with a bitter after-taste. What was interesting, was that for an IPA, the malt was the dominant smell, not the hops, making it unique in that respect.

After the IPA, we opened an Imperial Stout called The Dogfather. This stout poured like tar, and for me, that is a good thing. I really enjoy a thick, hearty stout. This beer was dark too, almost black, and it had a sweet malty taste that reminded one of the tasters of root beer. I too got that hint of root beer, but I also tasted hints of bourbon, from the barrel aged, but the bourbon was not as strong as previous beers. The after-taste of this beer was sweet chocolate.

The final beer of the evening, also from Laughing Dog was an Imperial Coffee Porter called Anubis. This beer had a slight sour smell and was much more mellow than the stout.

Again, another great week was had, and Idaho represented well. Next post is Wyoming.

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beer, History

Washington : Say WA!

While digging around the web to find something to put in this weeks post, I came upon the story of Bert Grant. Grant is credited with starting the first post-prohibition brewpub in the United States, back in 1982. Born in Scotland, Grant spent his formative years in Canada where he stared working in a brewery at the age of 16. Arriving in Yakima in 1967, Grant helped design and build a pelletizing operation for hops, before he finally opened his own brewery 15 years later. This pelletizing process was important for this region, and the craft beer industry.

Prior to the development of hops pellets, brewers had to rely on bales of whole hops. These bales were large and susceptible to spoilage. With the advent of the pellet, brewers could more easily store the hops, and had their brewing opportunities opened with the introduction of mixed hops pellets.

Washington presents as a craft beer state. From its Yakima valley, which comprising 75% of the total hops acreage in the U.S. and is one of the most productive hops production regions in the world, to its ranking of 8th nationally for breweries per capita. However when it came to locating beer from Washington, it was much harder than I expected. Because of that, we only had two different styles of beer to try  for this week.

washington craft beer

Two craft beers from Washington

 

The first beer of the evening was an Imperial IPA from Pyramid brewing called Outburst. Imperial, now a vague term meant to imply a stronger than normal beer, was originally intended for beer brewed for the crown heads of Europe. This beer, with its dark, golden honey color emitted a very sweet smell that carried over into its taste. In fact, it was one of the more sweeter IPAs we had this year.

The next, and final beer we cracked up was a barley wine. Known as the strongest of beers, barley wines are often 10% ABV and higher, and the one we had, Pike Old Bawdy, fell right on the mark with an ABV of 10%. With its Dark Red color, this beer was imposing. But the smell was even sweeter than the Outburst. With its thick mouth feel and sweet flavors, this beer was not something you would sit down and drink a glass of. It was a beer that would better complement a nice dessert.

With only two samples, we were presented with a really sweet introduction to the craft beer of Washington state. Given its strong history and importance to the brewing industry, getting the chance to try some beer from Washington was a fun experience.

Thanks for reading. Next post is Idaho.

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