beer, History

Arkansas: The Natural State

Who would have thought an Arkansas beer would be better than a British beer

On June 15, 1836 Arkansas became the 25th state of the United States.

Prohibition was an issue in Arkansas well before statehood. In 1832, a grand jury attempted to invoke a law prohibiting the production and sale of alcohol. However, that ordinance could not be enforced, and it would take a more organized effort from the temperance movement to get the state legislature to pass the first alcohol ban in the early 1850s. Luckily for breweries, these early attempts at prohibition were geared towards whiskey and other ‘hard’ liquors,” leaving beer consumption untouched until the national Prohibition.

While the temperance movement was busy lobbying the state legislature, the first known brewery in Arkansas was started by a German immigrant named Joseph Knoble. Settling in Fort Smith Arkansas somewhere between 1848 and 1851, Joseph Knoble constructed a three-story brewery that still stands today and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The Knoble Brewery operated until Joseph died in 1881. With the end of the Knoble Brewery, Arkansas would have to wait until after Prohibition to see another brewery operating in the state.

After a few failed attempts in the 1950s and again in the 1990s, it would take the turn of a new century to see a true revival of the beer scene in Arkansas. Now, 80 years after the repealing of the 21st Amendment, Arkansas has nine operating breweries, with more on the way. And this week, we had the opportunity to sample a beer from Core Brewing in Springdale thanks to the great folks at the Arkansas Beer Blog.

A few years before Joseph Knoble set up shop in Arkansas, John Fuller, Henry Smith, and John Turner started the Fuller Smith & Turner Brewery just outside of London, UK. Still in operation today, Fuller’s has a well established, easily accessible line of beer, including a beer introduced in 1971, the original ESB. With its profusion of rich malt, orangey fruit, and peppery hops, the Fuller’s ESB is an award winning beer. However, it wasn’t winning any awards this week, as we used it to compare against an excellent ESB brewed far from London.

Arkansas Craft Beer

Core Brewing ESB with Fuller’s ESB

For this weeks tasting, we had a welcome guest, Walt, who happened to be visiting one of our chief samplers. It was Walt, visiting New England from Sunny Florida, that provided that excellent quote at the beginning of this post.

Knowing that we only had one beer to sample this week, and having access to the original of the style, I decided it would be interesting to try them side-by-side to see how they stack up. So, on a beautiful, sunny New England day, we gathered around the table in the backyard to try some beer.

Arkansas Craft Beer

Core Brewery ESB

From the glass, the Core was a dark gold color with a thick head and had a nice fruity aroma. At the first sip, the aroma transformed into a pleasant nutty and caramel taste, finishing with a nice bitter dry mouthfeel. What a wonderful beer.

After polishing off the Core, we opened a bottle of Fuller’s ESB to try the original. Right from the start, it was obvious these two beers were not the same. The Fuller’s was lighter in color and  much sweeter, lacking that bitter finish that stood out with the Core. Overall, this beer was considered too sweet and  “kind of wimpy.”

To be fair, the American version of an ESB has derived from that original, evolving into its own distinct incarnation, however at the end of the day, put that Fuller’s back on the shelf and treat yourself to a Core.

Again, thanks to Jonas at the Arkansas Beer Blog (check out their site), for hooking us up with a great beer for this weeks tasting. Well done Arkansas!

Thanks for reading. Next week Michigan.

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